Archive for the ‘Authors’ Category

Shakespeare’s Plants (alphabetical)

October 31, 2007

Where there are known omissions I’ve put ellipses in brackets…. they are also listed by work here…. Links lead to cited passages.
___________________________________________
Acorn: Tempest, [1.2.467-469]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.28-31]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [3.2.328-330], As You Like It, [3.2.229-234] […]

Alder: Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.597-604].

Aloe: A Lover’s Complaint [272-273]. “And sweetens, in the suff’ring pangs it bears/ The aloes of all forces, shocks and fears.”

Almond (nut): “the parrat will not do more for an almond”, Troilus and Cressida, [5.2.194-200].

Apples: [Hamlet…] heads crushed like, Henry the Fifth [3.7.148-152]; island as apple, Tempest, [2.1.92-95]; “crabs” Tempest, [2.2.165-168]; Eve’s apple, Sonnets, [93]; crab/ crab apple pun King Lear, [1.5.14-20]; roasted crabs, Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.44-50]; Crab (name of dog), Two Gentlemen of Verona, [2.4.5-9]; apple of eye, Midsummer Night’s Dream, [3.2.102-104]; apple-john, Henry IV.1, [3.3.1-10]; apple-john, King Henry 4.2, [2.4.1-9]; pippin, King Henry 4.2, [5.3.1-4]; leathercoats King Henry 4.2, [5.3.41]; Twelfth Night, [1.5.153-159]; Twelfth Night, [5.1.219-221]; costard, King Richard the Third, [1.4.155-160]; crab tree slip Henry The Sixth, Part II, [3.2.210-215]; crab-tree, King Henry VIII, [5.4.1-10]; King Henry VIII, [5.4.59-65]; costard, Love’s Labor’s Lost, [3.1.69-73]; crabbed months Winter’s Tale, [1.2.99-105]; pomewater and crab, Love’s Labor’s Lost, [4.2.1-10]; apple of eye, Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.473-478]; crabs Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.908-925]; pippin Merry Wives of Windsor, [1.2.7-12]; costard Merry Wives of Windsor, [3.1.11-25]; crab-tree, Coriolanus, [2.1.182-190]; Taming of the Shrew, [1.1.134-139]; crab, Taming of the Shrew, [2.1.228-234];apple-tart Taming of the Shrew, [4.3.86-92].

Apricot (apricock): Midsummer Nights Dream, [3.1.162-165]; King Richard II, [3.4.29-39].

Ash: Coriolanus, [4.5.107-114].

Aspen: trembling like leaf of, King Henry 4.2, [2.4.1-9]; Titus Andronicus, [2.4.44-47].

Arabia Tree (acacia?): pheonix and turtle; medicinal gums of Othello, [5.2.352-360]; Tempest, [3.3.21-23].

Balsamam: Comedy of Errors, [4.1.87-89].

Barley: “Barley broth,” Henry The Fifth [3.5.14-26]; Tempest, [4.1.60-75];

Bay tree: King Richard II, [2.4.7-14]; King Henry VIII, [4.2.stage direction]; Pericles, [4.6.143-153].

Beans: peas and beans, Henry IV.1, [2.1.8-13].

Bilberry: Merry Wives of Windsor, [5.5.41-45].

Birch: Measure for Measure, [1.3.10-31].

Blackberry: reasons as plentiful as Henry IV.1, [2.4.234-238]; Henry IV.1, [2.4.394-405]; Troilus and Cressida, [5.3.4-12].

Bran: Measure for Measure, [4.3.151-158]; Love’s Labor Lost, [1.2.291-294]; Coriolanus, [3.1.321-327]; Cymbeline, [4.2.24-30].

Brier: […] Comedy of Errors, [2.2.173-179];Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.2-15]; Timon of Athens, [4.3.421-430]; Coriolanus, [3.3.50-55]; Titus Andronicus, [2.3.198-203];

Burnet: Henry the Fifth [5.2.33-59].

Cabbage: Merry Wives of Windsor, [1.1.111-116].

Camomile: Henry IV.1, [2.4.394-405];

Caraway: King Henry 4.2, [5.3.1-4].

Carduus Benedictus: Much Ado About Nothing, [3.5.66-75].

Carnation: Love’s Labor’s Lost, [3.1.143-148]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.79-103].

Cedar: “who doth the world so gloriously behold that cedar-tops and hills seem burnish’d gold,” Venus and Adonis, [853-852]; Tempest, [5.1.33-50]; King Richard the Third, [1.3.263-264]; King Henry the Sixth, Part II, [5.1.202-207]; Henry the Sixth, Part III, [5.2.7-18]; King Henry VIII, [5.5.48-56]; The Rape of Lucrece, [659-665]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [4.3.79-87]; Coriolanus, [5.3.56-62]; Titus Andronicus, [4.3.42-51]; Cymbeline, [4.4.138-144] also [5.5.437-444]; Cymbeline, [5.5.265-266].

Cherry: kissing cherries Midsummer Night’s Dream, [3.2.139-140]; double cherry, Midsummer Night’s Dream, [3.2.203-219]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [5.1.187-190]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [5.1.325-338]; cherry-pit (children’s game) Twelfth Night, [3.4.118-120]; cherry-lip King Richard the Third, [1.1.88-96]; King John, [2.1.160-163]; King Henry VIII, [5.1.165-171]; Pericles, [5 chorus.1-11].

Chestnut: Taming of the Shrew, [1.2.205-207]; As You Like It, [3.4.10-12].

Clover, Henry the Fifth [5.2.33-59]; honey-stalk, Titus Andronicus, [4.4.88-92].

Coloquintida: the object of Othello’s love will be as bitter as, Othello, [1.3.352];

Columbine, Hamlet 4.5 [190]. “There’s fennel for you, and columbines”; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.641-653].

Cork: The Winter’s Tale, [3.3.86-99].

Corn: Tempest, [2.1.149-157]; King Lear, [3.6.41-44]; “our sustaining corn” [4.4.1-8]; (or possibly oats), Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.64-68]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.93-95]; Henry IV.2, [4.1.189-196]; Macbeth, [4.1.52-61]; Henry the Sixth, part 1, [3.2.1-5]; Henry the Sixth, part 1, [3.2.13-15];Henry the Sixth, part 1, [3.2.40-44]; Henry the Sixth, part 1, [3.2.45-47]; King Henry the Sixth, part II., [1.2.1-2]; Henry The Sixth, Part II, [3.2.168-178]; Henry the Sixth, Part III, [5.7.1-15];King Richard II, [3.3.160-163]; King Henry VIII, [5.1.108-115]; King Henry VIII, [5.5.26-36]; Measure for Measure, [4.1.70-75];The Rape of Lucrece [281-282]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [1.1.94-96]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [4.3.379-382]; Pericles, [1.4.85-96]; Pericles, [3.3.19-27]; Coriolanus, [1.1.7-12]; Coriolanus, [1.1.203-214]; Coriolanus, [1.1.248-251]; Coriolanus, [3.1.113-125]; Coriolanus, [3.1.42-45]; Coriolanus, [3.1.42-45]; Coriolanus, [2.3.14-17]; Coriolanus, [3.1.62-74]; Titus Andronicus, [2.3.122-123]; Titus Andronicus, [5.3.67-72]; As You Like It, [5.3..15-32].

Cowslip, Henry the Fifth [5.2.33-59]; Tempest, [5.1.88-94]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.2-15]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [5.1.325-338]; Cymbeline, [2.2.37-40]; Cymbeline, [1.5.84-87].

Crowflowers, Hamlet 4.7[187-188]. “There with fantastic garlands did she come/ Of crowflowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples/ that liberal shepherds give a grosser name/ But our cold maids do dead men’s fingers call them.”

Crown Imperial: The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.109-135].

Cuckoo Flowers: King Lear, [4.4.1-8]; “cuckoo buds of yellow hue” = buttercup (?), Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.890-907].

Currant: The Winter’s Tale, [4.3.36-48].

Cypress: Twelfth Night, [2.3.113-119]; Twelfth Night, [3.1.117-122]; Henry The Sixth, Part II, [3.2.320-328]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.218-222]; Coriolanus, [1.10.30-33]; Taming of the Shrew, [2.1.343-352].

Daffodil: The Winter’s Tale, [4.3.1-12]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.109-135].

Daisy, Hamlet 4.5[198]. “There’s a daisy.” Hamlet 4.7[187-188]. “There with fantastic garlands did she come/ Of crowflowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples/ that liberal shepherds give a grosser name/ But our cold maids do dead men’s fingers call them”; The Rape of Lucrece [393-399]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.890-907]; Cymbeline, [4.2.397-401].

The Darnel, Henry the Fifth [5.2.33-59]; King Lear, [4.4.1-8]; Henry the Sixth, part 1, [3.2.40-44];

Dates: for Juliet’s wedding feast, Romeo and Juliet, [4.4.1-2]; All’s Well That End’s Well, [1.1.159-164]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.3.36-48].

Dewberry: Midsummer Nights Dream, [3.1.162-165];

Docks, Henry the Fifth [5.2.33-59]; The Tempest, [2.1.145-146].

Eglantine: Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.249-256]; Cymbeline, [4.2.221-231].

Elder:[many missing…] [Cymbeline] [see ‘alder’ Love’s labor…] Titus Andronicus, [2.3.198-203].

Elm: Comedy of Errors, [2.2.173-179]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [4.1.39-44]; King Henry 4.2, [2.4.330].

Eringo (candied sea holly): Merry Wives of Windsor, [5.5.17-21].

Fern: fern-seed Henry IV.1, [2.1.86-91].

Fennel, Hamlet 4.5 [195]. “There’s fennel for you.” Romeo and Juliet [1.2.26-30]. “When well-appareled April on the heel/ Of limping Winter treads, even such delight/ Among fresh fennel buds shall you this night/ Inherit at my house.” Henry 4.2, [2.4.142-147].

Fig, Henry the Fifth [3.6.59-62]. (Pistol) “Die and be damned! and figo for thy friendship!” Fluellen: “It is well.” Pistol: “The fig of Spain!” Fluellen: “Very good.” Anthony and Cleopatra, long life better than [1.2.32-35]; in act 5; virtue, a fig, Othello, [1.3.322-335]; “bless’d fig’s end”, Othello, [2.1.251-255]; Midsummer Nights Dream, [3.1.162-165]; ‘Fig me’ King Henry 4.2, [5.3.117-121]; King Henry The Sixth, Pt. II, [2.3.59-71]; King John, [2.1.160-163]; Merry Wives of Windsor, [1.3.26-28].

Flax: Winter’s Tale, [1.2.266-277]; Merry Wives of Windsor, [5.5.150-162].

Fumiter: Henry the Fifth[5.2.37-44]. “And all her husbandry doth lie on heaps,/ Corrupting in it own fertitlity./ Her vine, the merry cheerer of the heart/ Unpruned dies; her hedges even-pleached, like prisoners wildly overgown with hair,/ Put forth disordered twigs; her fallow leas/ The darnel, hemlock and rank fumitory/ Doth root upon, while that the coulter rusts/ That should deracinate such savagery;” King Lear, [4.4.1-8];

Furrow weed: King Lear, [4.4.1-8];

Furze (Gorse): Tempest, [1.1.65-68]; furze and goss Tempest, [4.1.178-181].

Garlic: [4.2.37-42]; Measure for Measure, [3.2.166-178]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.162]; Coriolanus, [4.6.97-102].

Gillyvore: The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.79-103].

Ginger, Henry the Fifth [3.7.19-25]. Orleans: “He’s the color of nutmeg.” Dauphin: “And of the heat of the ginger. It is a beast for Perseus: he is pure air and faire; and the dull elements of earth and water never appear in him. but only in patient stillness while his rider mounts him. He is indeed a horse, and all other jades you may call beasts.” Henry IV.1, [2.1.25-26]; Twelfth Night, [2.3.113-119]; Measure for Measure, [4.3.1-11]; ginger bread, Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.1.68-75]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.3.36-48].

Gooseberry: King Henry 4.2, [1.2.167-176];

Grape: song to Bacchus, Antony and Cleopatra [2.7.19-144], Egypt’s grape, [5.2.337-339]; “the wine she drinks is made of grapes”, Othello, [2.1.251-255]; Midsummer Nights Dream, [3.1.162-165]; All’s Well That Ends Well, [2.1.69-72]; All’s Well That Ends Well, [2.3.99-101]; Measure for Measure, [2.1.128-133]; Timon of Athens, [4.3.433-440]; Coriolanus, [5.4.16-20]; As You Like It, [5.1.31-35].

Grass: [hamlet, romeo, antony…]; Tempest, [2.1.55]; The Tempest, [4.1.76-83]; Comedy of Errors, [2.2.198-201]; bladed grass, Midsummer Night’s Dream, [1.1.209-213]; All’s Well That End’s Well, [5.4.1-4]; King Henry the Sixth, Part II, [4.10.36-40]; King Henry the Sixth, Part II, [4.10.1-15]; King Henry the Sixth, Part II, [4.10.1-15]; Henry The Sixth, Part II, [4.2.62-67]; King Richard II, [1.3.280-293]; King Richard II, [3.3.42-50]; King Richard II, [3.3.93-100]; The Rape of Lucrece [393-399]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.185-191]; Timon of Athens, [4.3.421-430]; Titus Andronicus, [4.4.69-72].

Greenwood: As You Like It, [2.5.1-5].

Hardock: King Lear, [4.4.1-8];

Harebell: Cymbeline, [4.2.221-231].

Hawthorn: through the sharp hawthorn blows the cold wind, King Lear, [3.4.45-47] and [3.4.93-98]; beginning to bud, Midsummer Night’s Dream, [1.1.182-185]; Midsummer Nights Dream, [3.1.3-5]; Henry the Sixth, Part III, [2.5.40-54]; Hawthorne: Henry the Sixth, Part III, [2.5.40-54]; Merry Wives of Windsor, [3.3.61-67]; As You Like It, [3.2.351-357].

Hazelnut: chariot Romeo and Juliet [1.4.53-71]; as source of offense, Romeo and Juliet [3.1.16-24]; Taming of the Shrew, [2.1.239-253].

Hemlock, Henry the Fifth[5.2.37-44]. “And all her husbandry doth lie on heaps,/ Corrupting in it own fertitlity./ Her vine, the merry cheerer of the heart/ Unpruned dies; her hedges even-pleached, like prisoners wildly overgown with hair,/ Put forth disordered twigs; her fallow leas/ The darnel, hemlock and rank fumitory/ Doth root upon, while that the coulter rusts/ That should deracinate such savagery”; King Lear, [4.4.1-8]; Macbeth, [4.1.22-32].

Hemp: Midsummer Night’s Dream, [3.1.72-73]; hempseed (reference to noose) King Henry 4.2, [2.1.55-57]; hempen caudle, King Henry the Sixth, Part II, [4.7.82-86]; King Henry the Sixth, Part II, [4.7.82-86]; crack-hemp (a bird?) Taming of the Shrew, [5.1.36-40].

Holly: As You Like It, [2.7.179-182].

Honeysuckle: Midsummer Night’s Dream, [4.1.39-44]; honeysuckle King Henry 4.2, [2.1.47-52]; Much Ado About Nothing, [3.1.1-11].

Hyssop: Othello, [1.3.322-335];

Ivy: Tempest, [1.2.79-87]; Comedy of Errors, [2.2.173-179]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [4.1.39-44]; The Passionate Pilgrim, [19.9-16]; The Winter’s Tale, [3.3.58-67].

Kecksy, Henry the Fifth[5.2.51-56]. “The even mead, that erst brough sweetly forth/ The freckled cowslip, burnet, and green clover,/ Wanting the scythe, all uncorrected, rank,/ Conceives by idleness and nothing teems/ but hateful docks, rough thistles, kecksies, burrs,/ Losing both beauty and utility.”

Knot grass: Midsummer Night’s Dream, [3.2.328-330];

Lady smocks (cuckoo?): Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.890-907].

Laurel: Henry the Sixth, Part III, [4.6.32-36]; Titus Andronicus, [1.1.73-79].

Lavender: The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.103-108].

The Leek, Henry the Fifth [4.7.100-106]. Fluellen: “If your Majesties is remeb’red of it, the Welshmen did good service in a garden where leeks did grow, wearing leeks in their Monmouth caps; which your Majesty know to this hour is an honorable badge of the service; and I do believe your Majesty takes no scorn to wear the leek upon Saint Tavy’s day.” King: “I wear it for a memorable honor; For I am Welsh, you know, good countryman.” The leek continues to be mentioned through the first scene of act five, in which Fluellan repays Pistol for having mocked the leek he wears, by making Pistol eat it: [5.1.1-2] “But why wear your leek today? Saint Davy’s day is past.” [5.1.8-10] “(Pistol) is come to me, and prings me pread and salt yesterday, look you, and bid me eat my leak.” [5.1.22] “I am qualmish at the smell of leak.” [5.1.25]. [5.1.39] “if you can mock a leak, you can eat a leak.” [5.1.48]. [5.1.63-65]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [5.1.325-338];

Lemon: Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.641-653].

Lettuce: Othello, [1.3.322-335];

Lily: “Lily fingers,” Venus and Adonis, [223-228]; “A lily prison’d in a jail of snow,/ Or ivory in an alabaster band,/ So white a friend engirts so white a foe” [361-364]; in reference again to Adonis’ flesh, [1051-1056]; lilies that fester, Sonnets, [94]; compare with pale hand, Sonnets, [99]; lily-livered, King Lear, [1.2.14-24]; Midsummer Nights Dream, [3.1.88-92]; Two Gentlemen of Verona, [2.4.19-20]; Two Gentlemen of Verona, [4.148-155]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [5.1.325-338]; lily beds, Troilus and Cressida, [3.2.7-12]; lily-livered, Macbeth, [5.3.14-17]; King Henry VIII, [3.1.148-153]; King Henry VIII, [5.5.57-63]; King John, [3.1.51-55]; King John, [4.2.9-16]; The Rape of Lucrece, [71-77]; The Rape of Lucrece [386-389]; The Rape of Lucrece, [477-482]; The Passionate Pilgrim, [7.1-6]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.350-357]; flower-de-luce, The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.109-135]; Titus Andronicus, [2.4.44-47]; Titus Andronicus, [3.1.110-113]; Cymbeline, [4.2.203-205]; Cymbeline, [2.2.11-17].

Lime/ Linden tree: “line-grove” Tempest, [5.1.7-10];

Lime (citrus fruit): Merry Wives of Windsor, [1.3.13-14].

Long Purples, (purple orchid?), Hamlet 4.7[187-188]. “There with fantastic garlands did she come/ Of crowflowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples/ that liberal shepherds give a grosser name/ But our cold maids do dead men’s fingers call them.”

Love in Idleness (Pansy): Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.165-172]; Taming of the Shrew, [1.1.148-156].

Mallow: Tempest, [2.1.145-146];

The Mandrake. Romeo and Juliet, [4.3.45-54]; mandragora as sleeping potion, Antony and Cleopatra [1.5.3-7]; Othello, [3.3.326-337]; King Henry 4.2, [1.2.14-20]; Henry 4.2, [3.2.307-314]; Henry The Sixth, Part II, [3.2.307-315];

The Marigold (mary-bud): “as the marigold at the sun’s eye,” Sonnet [25]; The Rape of Lucrece [393-399]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.103-108]; Cymbeline, [2.2.20-25].

Marjoram: compared with beloved’s hair, Sonnets, [99]; cure for madness, King Lear, [4.6.93]; All’s Well That Ends Well, [4.5.1-4]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.103-108].

Medlar, family rosaceae. With sexual innuendo, Romeo and Juliet [2.1.33-36];Measure for Measure, [4.3.151-158]; Timon of Athens, [4.3.305-317]; As You Like It, [3.2.113-118].

Mint: Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.641-653].

Mistletoe: Titus Andronicus, [2.3.91-108].

Moss: […], Comedy of Errors, [2.2.173-179]; Henry IV.1, [3.1.26-33]; Timon of Athens, [4.3.222-229]; Titus Andronicus, [2.3.91-108]; Cymbeline, [4.2.221-231].

Mulberry: Midsummer Nights Dream, [3.1.162-165]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [5.1.143-148]; Coriolanus, [3.2.74-82].

Mushroom:Tempest, [5.1.33-50];

Mustard: (a character in Midsummer Night’s Dream); Tewkesbury mustard, King Henry 4.2, [2.4.142-147]; Taming of the Shrew, [4.2.23-30]; As You Like It, [1.2.61-65]; As You Like It, [1.2.62-77].

Myrtle: Antony and Cleopatra, [3.12.9-12]; Venus and Adonis, [865-868]; Measure for Measure, [2.2.114-127]; The Passionate Pilgrim, [20.1-12]; The Passionate Pilgrim, [19.9-16]; The Passionate Pilgrim, [11.1-4].

Nettles: [Hamlet, Henry the Fifth…]; Othello, [1.3.322-335]; Tempest, [2.1.145-146]; King Lear, [4.4.1-8]; nettle danger Henry IV.1, [2.3.6-10]; King Richard II, [3.2.12-22]; King Henry 5, [1.1.60-66]; Winter’s Tale, [1.2.323-332]; Coriolanus, [2.1.182-190]; Titus Andronicus, [2.3.198-203].

Nutmeg, Henry the Fifth [3.7.19-25]. Orleans: “He’s the color of nutmeg.” Dauphin: “And of the heat of the ginger. It is a beast for Perseus: he is pure air and faire; and the dull elements of earth and water never appear in him. but only in patient stillness while his rider mounts him. He is indeed a horse, and all other jades you may call beasts” Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.641-653]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.3.36-48].

Oak: mountains melting on, Othello, [2.1.5-9]; brobantio’s eyes closed up as, Othello, [3.3.215-220]; Tempest, [1.2.295-297];Tempest, [5.1.33-50]; “oak-cleaving” lightning, King Lear, [3.2.4-7]; duke’s oak, Midsummer Night’s Dream, [1.2.101]; King Henry the Sixth, Part III, [2.1.50-55]; Henry the Sixth, Part III, [5.2.7-18]; The Rape of Lucrece, [946-952]; Measure for Measure, [2.2.114-127]; Much Ado About Nothing, [2.1.229-237]; Winter’s Tale, [2.3.70-90]; Julius Caesar, [1.3.3-13]; Timon of Athens, [4.3.262-272]; Timon of Athens, [4.3.421-430]; Merry Wives of Windsor, Herne’s oak; Coriolanus, [1.1.173-189]; Coriolanus, [1.3.5-17]; Coriolanus, [2.1.121-127]; Coriolanus, [2.2.97-107]; Coriolanus, [5.2.110-112]; Coriolanus, [5.3.148-155]; Cymbeline, [4.2.265-270]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [4.2.102-107]; The Passionate Pilgrim, [5.1-4]; As You Like It, [2.1.29-35]; As You Like It, [3.2.229-234]. As You Like It, [4.3.103-108].

Oats: Tempest, [4.1.60-75]; King Lear, [5.3.39-40]; peas and beans, Henry IV.1, [2.1.8-13]; Hugh Oatcake, Much Ado About Nothing, [3.3.9-12]; Taming of the Shrew, [3.2.203-205].

Olive: as peace symbol, Antony and Cleopatra, [4.6.5-7]; as peace symbol, Sonnets, [107]; King Henry 4.2, [4.4.84-87]; Twelfth Night, [1.5.204-206]; Henry the Sixth, Part III, [4.6.32-36]; Timon of Athens, [5.4.79-85]; As You Like It, [3.5.72-75]; As You Like It, [4.3.76-81].

Onion: Midsummer Night’s Dream, [4.2.37-42]; All’s Well That End’s Well, [5.3.318]; Taming of the Shrew, [Intro.1.123-127].

Orange: Much Ado About Nothing, [4.1.29-32]; Coriolanus, [2.1.67-72]; Much Ado About Nothing, [2.1.279-281].

Oxlip: Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.249-256];The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.109-135].

Palm,Hamlet 5.2[44]. “As love between them like the palm might flourish/ As peace should still her wheaten garland wear.” Also “palmy” at (1.1.126): “high and palmy state of Rome”; Troilus and Cressida, [2.3.189-193]; Troilus and Cressida, [3.1.155-158]; King Henry VIII, [4.2.stage direction]; Julius Caesar, [1.2.121-131]; Coriolanus, [5.3.111-118]; As You Like It, [3.2.170-175].

Parsley: Taming of the Shrew, [4.4.99-104].

Peach: peach-color’d, King Henry 4.2 [2.2.12-18]; Measure for Measure, [4.3.1-11].

Peas/ Pease: peas and beans, Henry IV.1, [2.1.8-13]; pease Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.316-321]; Tempest, [4.1.60-75]; peascod King Henry 4.2, [2.4.142-147]; As You Like It, [2.4.44-53].

Pear, “Pop’rin Pear”: Romeo and Juiet [2.1.37-38]; All’s Well That End’s Well, [1.1.159-164]; Merry Wives of Windsor, [4.5.88-97].

Pepper: […]; Twelfth Night, [3.4.145-148].

Pig-nut(peanut): Tempest, [2.2.165-168];

Pine: Antony and Cleopatra, [4.12.1-4], [4.12.26]; Tempest, [1.2.271–282] and [287-294]; Tempest, [5.1.33-50];Merchant of Venice, [4.1.70-80]; King Henry The Sixth, Pt. II, [2.3.45-46]; King Richard II, [3.2.36-46]; Rape of Lucrece, [1163-1169];Winter’s Tale, [2.1.33-36]; Cymbeline, [4.2.170-182].

Plum: Venus and Adonis, [527-528]; plum tree and damsons, King Henry The Sixth, Pt. II, [2.94-105]; King John, [2.1.160-163]; The Passionate Pilgrim, [10.1-6].

The Pomegranate Tree: as home of the nightingale, Romeo and Juliet [3.5.1-5]; All’s Well That Ends Well, [2.3.258-263];

Poppy: Othello, [3.3.326-337];

Posy: The Passionate Pilgrim, [19.9-16]; Merry Wives of Windsor, [3.1.11-25].

Potato: potato-finger, Troilus and Cressida, [5.2.57-59]; Merry Wives of Windsor, [5.5.17-21].

Primrose: Hamlet 1.3. “But, good my brother/ Do not, as some ungracious pastors do/ Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven/ Whiles, like a puff’d and reckless libertine/ Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads/ And recks not his own rede.” Venus and Adonis, [151-156]; primrose beds, Midsummer Night’s Dream, [1.1.214-219]; Henry The Sixth, Part II, [3.2.56-64]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.109-135]; Cymbeline, [4.2.221-231]; Cymbeline, [1.5.84-87].

Prune: Henry IV.1, [3.3.113-116]; King Henry 4.2, [2.4.142-147]; Measure for Measure, [2.1.89-110]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.3.36-48]; Merry Wives of Windsor, [1.1.263-268].

Pumpkin, (pumpion): Merry Wives of Windsor, [3.3.34-36].

Quince: for Juliet’s wedding feast, Romeo and Juliet, [4.4.1-2];

Radish: Henry IV.1, [2.4.183-186]; Henry 4.2, [3.2.307-314].

Raisin: The Winter’s Tale, [4.3.36-48].

Reed: Antony and Cleopatra, [2.7.11-13]; Tempest, [1.2.212-215]; Tempest, [5.1.15-16]; trembling reeds, Henry IV.1, [1.3.102-107]; reed voice, Merchant of Venice, [2.9.62-72]; Rape of Lucrece [1436-1442]; Cymbeline, [4.2.265-270].

Rhubarb: Macbeth, [5.3.51-57].

Rice: The Winter’s Tale, [4.3.36-48].

Rose, Hamlet 3.2 [287-290]. “Would not this, sir, and a forest of feathers –if the rest of my fortunes turn Turk with me– with two Provincial roses on my razed shoes, get me a fellowship in a cry of players, sir?”Hamlet 3.4[51]. “Such an act/ That blurs the grace and blush of modesty/ Calls virtue hpocrite; takes off the rose/ From the fair forehead of an innocent love/ And sets a blister there…” Hamlet 3.1 [162] “The expectancy and rose of the fair state.”Hamlet 4.5[173]. “O rose of May/ Dear maid, kind sister, sweet Ophelia!”; Romeo and Juliet, [2.2.43-44], “What’s in a name?”; of lips and cheeks, Romeo and Juliet, [4.1.99-101]; old rose cakes, Romeo and Juliet, [5.1.37-52]; beauty’s rose, sonnet [1]; Antony and Cleopatra, [3.13.25-30]; blown rose, Antony and Cleopatra [3.13.45-47]; “Rose-lipp’d,” Othello, [4.2.62-79]; “When I have plucked the rose I can not give it vital life again” Othello, [5.2.13-15];Venus and Adonis: “rose-cheeked Adonis” [3]; “more white and red than doves and roses are”, [7-12]; war god a prisoner in a red-rose chain [109-112]; has prickles yet is plucked [571-576]; like lawn upon, [589-592]; “gloss on the rose” [931-936]; aroma of rose, sonnet [54]; Sonnets [67]; canker in “fragrant rose” Sonnets, [95]; deep vermillion in, Sonnets, [98]; a white rose, a red rose, a third niether white or red, Sonnets, [99]; Sonnets, [109]; roses damask’d, red and white, Sonnets, [130]; earthlier happy is the rose distilled, Midsummer Night’s Dream, [1.1.74-78]; faded roses, Midsummer Nights Dream [1.1.128-129]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.107-111]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.249-256]; muskrose buds Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.2.1-7]; Midsummer Nights Dream, [3.1.88-92]; Two Gentlemen of Verona, [4.148-155]; musk roses Midsummer Night’s Dream, [4.1.1-4]; rose and thorns, All’s Well That Ends Well, [1.3.125-128]; rose and thorns, All’s Well That Ends Well, [4.2.17-19]; of King Richard, Henry IV.1, [1.3.170-176]; Twelfth Night, [2.4.36-39]; damask, Twelfth Night, [2.4.109-112]; Twelfth Night, [3.1.149-152]; King Richard the Third, [4.3.1-13]; King Henry VI, part I, [2.4.25-76]; King Henry the Sixth, part I, [2.4.121-127]; Henry the Sixth, part 1, [4.1.89-100]; Henry the Sixth, part 1, [4.1.148-154]; King Richard the Third, [5.5.15-21]; King Henry the Sixth, part II., [1.1.246-257]; King Henry the Sixth, part I, [2.4.107-111]; King Henry the Sixth, Part III, [1.2.32-34]; red and white roses, Henry the Sixth, Part III, [2.5.94-102]; red rose Henry the Sixth, Part III, [5.1.81-88]; King John, [1.1.138-147]; The Rose (a manor) King Henry VIII, [1.2.151-155]; King John, [3.1.51-55]; The Rape of Lucrece, [491-494]; The Rape of Lucrece, [71-77]; The Rape of Lucrece [386-389]; The Rape of Lucrece, [477-482]; Measure for Measure, [1.4.16-20]; Much Ado About Nothing, [1.3.19-30]; The Passionate Pilgrim, [19.9-16]; The Passionate Pilgrim, [10.1-6]; damask, The Passionate Pilgrim, [7.1-6]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [1.1.100-109]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [4.3.23-26]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.291-298]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.218-222]; Timon of Athens, [4.3.84-88]; Pericles, [4.6.32-41]; Pericles, [5 chorus.1-11]; Merry Wives of Windsor, [3.1.11-25]; damask Coriolanus, [2.1.203-219]; Titus Andronicus, [2.4.16-27;.Cymbeline, [2.2.8-19]; rosy, Cymbeline. [5.5.121-123]; rose-water Taming of the Shrew, [Intro.1.54-57]; Taming of the Shrew, [2.1.170-176]; As You Like It, [1.2.21-22]; As You Like It, [3.2.107-110]; As You Like It, damask [3.5.120-123].

Rosemary, Hamlet 4.5 [190]. “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance. Pray you, love, remember.” Romeo and Juliet [2.4.212-219]. Romeo and Juliet, [4.5.80-84]; King Lear, [2.3.13-20]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.70-78]; Pericles, [4.6.143-153].

Rue, Hamlet 4.5 [190]. “There’s rue for you, and here’s some for me. We may call it herb of grace o’Sundays. O, you must wear your rue with a difference!”; herb of grace, All’s Well That End’s Well, [4.5.1-4]; “even for Ruth”, King Richard II, [3.4.102-107]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.70-78].

Rush: […]; Henry IV.1, [3.1.207-215]; King John, [4.3.125-134]; The Rape of Lucrece [316-321]; Coriolanus, [1.1.173-189]; Coriolanus, [1.4.16-20]; Cymbeline, [2.2.11-17]; Taming of the Shrew, [4.2.39-45]; Taming of the Shrew, [4.5.12-15]; As You Like It, [3.2.360-362]; As You Like It, [3.5.20-27].

Rye: Tempest, [4.1.60-75]; rye-straw hats, Tempest, [4.1.134-138]; As You Like It, [5.3..15-32].

Saffron: The Tempest, [4.1.76-83]; Comedy of Errors, [4.4.60-64]; All’s Well That End’s Well, [4.5.1-4]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.3.36-48].

Samphire: King Lear, [4.6.15].

Savory: The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.103-108].

Sedge: […] Taming of the Shrew, [Intro.2.49-53].

Senna: Macbeth, [5.3.51-57].

Spear-grass: Henry IV.1, [2.4.306-310].

Squash: Midsummer Nights Dream, [3.1.181-184]; Twelfth Night, [1.5.153-159]; Winter’s Tale, [1.2.153-161].

The Strawberry,Henry the Fifth [1.1.60-66]. “The strawberry grows underneath the nettle/ and wholesome berries thrive and ripen best/ Neighbored by fruit of baser quality;/ And so the Prince obscured his contemplation/ Under the veil of wildness, which (no doubt)/ Grew like the summer grass, fastest by night/ Unseen, yet crescive in his faculty;” decorating Desdamona’s handkerchief, Othello, [3.3.437-439]; King Richard the Third, [3.4.29-33]; King Richard the Third, [3.4.46-47].

The Sycamore Maple. Romeo and Juliet [1.1.121-126], “Madam, an hour before the worshiped sun/ Peered forth the golden window of the East,/ A troubled mind drave me to walk abroad;/ Where, underneath the grove of sycamore/ That westard rooteth from this city side,/ So early walking did I see your son.” In ‘the willow song’, Othello, [4.3.43-59]; Sycamore: Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.89-96].

Thistle: Midsummer Night’s Dream, [4.1.10-12];

Thyme: “weed up thyme”, Othello, [1.3.322-335]; where wild thyme grows Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.249-256].

Turnip: Merry Wives of Windsor, [3.4.82-86].

Vine: […] Antony and Cleopatra [2.7.19-144]; King Richard III, [5.2.7-16]; Henry the Sixth, part 1, [2.5.8-12]; King Henry VIII, [5.5.26-36]; King Henry VIII, [5.5.48-56]; The Rape of Lucrece [213-215]; Timon of Athens, [4.3.188-199].

The Violet, Hamlet I.3. “A violet in the youth of primy nature,/ Forward, not permanent, sweet, not lasting,/ the perfume and suppliance of a minute/ –No more.” Hamlet 4.5 [191]. “And there is pansies, that’s for thoughts.” Hamlet 4.5[198-200]. “I would give you some violets, but they withered all when my father died. They say he made a good end.” Violet past its prime, Sonnets, [12]; purple violet, Sonnets, [99]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.249-256]; Twelfth Night, [1.1.1-7]; King Richard II, [5.2.46-52]; King John, [4.2.9-16]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.890-907]; The Winter’s Tale, [4.4.109-135]; Pericles, [4.1.14-21]; Cymbeline, [4.2.170-182]; Cymbeline, [1.5.84-87].

Wheat: “measures of wheat to Rome,”Antony and Cleopatra, [2.6.45]; Tempest, [4.1.60-75]; green wheat Midsummer Night’s Dream, [1.1.182-185]; King Henry 4.2, [5.1.12-16]; Merry Wives of Windsor, [4.2.149-154]; Taming of the Shrew, [4.3.63-68].

Willow: [Hamlet…] ‘the willow song,’ Othello, [4.3.28-58] (full song here); Twelfth Night, [1.5.263-271]; Merchant of Venice, [5.1.9-12]; [3.3.227-228]; Henry the Sixth, Part III, [4.1.96-100]; Much Ado About Nothing, [2.1.181-185/ 206-221]; osier The Passionate Pilgrim, [6.1-6]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [4.2.102-107]; The Passionate Pilgrim, [5.1-4]; As You Like It, [4.3.76-81].

Woodbine: Midsummer Night’s Dream, [2.1.249-256]; Midsummer Night’s Dream, [4.1.39-44]; Much Ado About Nothing, [3.1.26-31].

Wormword, Hamlet 3.2. “In second husband let me be accurst! None wed the second but who killed the first./ Ham.(aside): Wormwood, wormwood!” Romeo and Juliet [1.3.24-32]. Nurse.. “And she was weaned (I never shall forget it),/ Of all the days of the year, upon that day;/ For I had then laid wormwood to my dug,/ Sitting in the sun under the dovehouse wall./ My Lord and you were then at Mantua./ Nay, I do bear a brain. But, as I said,/ When it did taste the wormwood on the nipple/ Of my dug and felt it bitter, pretty fool,/ To see it tetchy and fall out with the dug”; The Rape of Lucrece, [890-896]; Love’s Labor’s Lost, [5.2.836-850].

Yew : near juliet’s tomb, Romeo and Juliet [5.3.1-9]; Twelfth Night, [2.3.113-119]; Macbeth, [4.1.22-32]; King Richard II, [3.2.112-120]; Titus Andronicus, [2.3.91-108].

Advertisements