Oak

Coriolanus, [1.3.5-17]. Volumnia. “When yet he was but tender-bodied and the only son of my womb, when youth with comeliness pluck’d all gaze his way, when for a day of kings’ entreaties a mother should not sell him an hour from her beholding, I, considering how honor would become such a person, that it was no better than picture-like to hang by th’ wall, if renown made it not stire, was pleas’d to let him seek danger where he was like to find fame. To a cruel war I sent him, from whence he return’d, his brows bound with oak. I tell thee, daughter, I sprang not more in joy at first hearing he was a man-child than now in first seeing he had prov’d himself a man.”

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One Response to “Oak”

  1. Shakespeare’s Plants (alphabetical) « PLANTS Says:

    […] Merry Wives of Windsor, Herne’s oak; Coriolanus, [1.1.173-189]; Coriolanus, [1.3.5-17]; Coriolanus, [2.1.121-127]; Coriolanus, [2.2.97-107]; Coriolanus, [5.2.110-112]; Coriolanus, […]

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