Archive for August, 2007

Plants in King Henry VI, part 3

August 30, 2007

Cedar: [5.2.7-18]. Corn: [5.7.1-15]. Hawthorn: [2.5.40-54]. Laurel: [4.6.32-36]. Oak: [2.1.50-55]; [5.2.7-18]. Olive: [4.6.32-36]. Rose: white rose [1.2.32-34]; red and white roses, [2.5.94-102]; red rose [5.1.81-88]. Willow: [3.3.227-228]; [4.1.96-100].

General references: root [1.1.45-49]; flower [2.1.68-73]; straw [2.2.144-145]; root [2.2.163-169]; branches, leaves, root [2.5.94-102]; weeds [2.6.14-21]; [2.6.46-51]; fruit of love [3.2.58-61]; branch [3.2.124-127]; thorns [3.2.174-181]; plant of love, root, leaves, fruit [3.3.119-128]; replant (v.) [3.3.192-198]; garland [3.3.227-228]; brake [3.1.1-4]; garland [4.1.96-100]; fruit [4.4.16-24]; thicket [4.5.1-13]; branch [4.6.32-36]; hay [4.8.60-61]; branch, shrub [5.2.7-18]; thorn, roots [5.4.67-72]; thorn [5.5.12-16]; plant [5.5.51-62]; bush [5.6.11-17]; tree, fruit [5.6.36-52]; harvest [5.7.16-25]; tree, fruit [5.7.26-32].

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Tree, fruit

August 30, 2007

Henry the Sixth, Part III, [5.7.26-32]. King Edward. “Clarence and Gloucester, love my lovely qlueen,/ And kiss your princely nephew, brothers both.” Clarence. “The duty that I owe unto your Majesty/ I seal upon the lips of this sweet babe. [kisses the prince.] Queen Elizabether. “Thanks, noble Clarence; worthy brother, thanks. Gloucester. “And, that I love the tree from whence thou sprang’st,/ Witness the loving kiss I give the fruit.”

Harvest

August 30, 2007

Henry the Sixth, Part III, [5.7.16-25]. King Edward. “Young Ned, for thee, thine uncles and myself/ Have in our armors watch’d the winter’s night,/ Went all afoot in summer’s scalding heat,/ That thou mightst repossess the crown in peace; and of our labors thou shalt reap the gain.” Gloucester.(aside) “I’ll blast his harvest, if your head were laid;/ For yet I am not look’d on in the world,/ This should was ordain’d so thick to heave,/ And heave it shall some weight, or break my back./ Work thou the way, and thou shalt execute.”

Corn

August 30, 2007

Henry the Sixth, Part III, [5.7.1-15]. King Edward. “Once more we sit in England’s royal throne,/ Repurchas’d with the blood of enemies./ What valiant foemen, like to autumn’s corn,/ Have we mow’d down in tops of all their pride!/ Three Dukes of Somerset, threefold renown’d/ for hardy and undoubted champions;/ Two Cliffords, as the father and the son,/ And two Northumberlands –two braver men/ Ne’er spurr’d their coursers at the trumpet’s sound;/ With them, the two brave bears, Warwick and Montague,/ That in their chains fetter’d the kingly lion/ And made the forest tremble when they roar’d./ Thus have we swept suspicion for our sweat/ And made our footstool of security./ Come hither, Bess, and let me kiss my boy.”

Tree, fruit

August 30, 2007

Henry the Sixth, Part III, [5.6.36-52]. King Henry. “Hadst thou been kill’d when first thou didst presume,/ Thou hadst not liv’d to kill a son of mine,/ And thus I prophesy, that many a thousand,/ Which now mistrust no parcel of my fear,/ And many an old man’s sigh and many a widow’s,/ And many an orphan’s water-standing eye–/ Men for their sons, wives for their husbands,/ Orphans for their parents’ timeless death–/ Shall rue the hour that ever thou was born./ The owl shriek’d at thy birth –an evil sign;/l The night-crow cried, aboding luckless time;/ Dogs howl’d, and hideous tempest shook down trees;/ The raven rook’d her on the chimney’s top, and Chatt’ring pies in dismal discords sung./ Thy mother felt more than a mother’s pain,/ And yet brought forth less than a mother’s hope,/ To wit, an indigested and deformed lump,/ not like the fruit of such a goodly tree.”