Plants in Hamlet

Apple: [4.3.15-22]. Columbine: [4.5.176-188]. Crow Flowers: [4.7.166-184]. Daisy: [4.5.176-188]; [4.7.166-184]. Fennel: [4.5.176-188]. Flax: flaxen [4.5.199-200]. Grass: [3.2.338-344]; [4.5.28-32]. Hebenon: [1.5.60-71]. Long Purples: [4.7.166-184]. Nettles: [4.7.166-184]. Palm: palmy [1.1.113-114]; [5.2.38-47]. Pansy: [4.5.176-188]. Plum: [2.2.197-204]. Primrose: [1.3.45-51]. Rose: [3.1.153-154]; [3.2.287-290]; [3.4.40-46]; [4.5.156-162]. Rosemary: [4.5.176-188]. Rue: [4.5.176-188]. Violet: [1.3.5-10]; [4.5.176-188]; [5.1.238-242]. Wheat: [5.2.38-47]. Wormwood: [3.2.175-179]. Willow: [4.7.166-184].

General references: all mentions of weeds; seed, weed, garden [1.2.133-137]; buttons, infants of the spring [1.3.36-44]; thorny way to heaven [1.3.45-51]; weed, lethe’s brambles [1.5.32-35]; weed, orchard [1.5.60-71]; thorns [1.5.81-89]; fruit [2.2.46-52]; fruits [2.2.142-151]; nutshell [2.2.244-257]; sallets [2.2.437-445]; sugar (v.) [3.1.44-49]; “inoculate our old stock” [3.1.116-121]; “blown”, honey [3.1.153-154]; [3.2.133]; unripe fruit, tree [3.2.184-189]; drug, weed, blown, garden [3.2.253-262]; straw [4.4.25-29]; straw [4.4.53-55]; straws [4.5.4-7]; flowers [4.5.38-40]; weeds (clothing) [4.7.77-81]; simples [4.7.140-148]; bough, garland, weed, “weedy” [4.7.166-184]; gardeners [5.1.26-31]; crants [5.1.226-234]; garland [5.2.38-47]; fanned and winnowed [5.2.186-193].

Advertisements

3 Responses to “Plants in Hamlet”

  1. Hamlet Rennovation « PLANTS Says:

    […] By ferdinando Rennovated the Hamlet concordance this past week and find myself thinking about Rosencrantz -rose -en- crantz. Wikipedia says that […]

  2. Observation « PLANTS Says:

    […] (the crown), the most frequently mentioned furnishing (the bed) and the most frequently mentioned plant (the rose) and “nothing”, and saw in which act each word appeared the most frequently. […]

  3. Plants « PLANTS Says:

    […] VIII, Romeo and Juliet, Coriolanus, Titus Andronicus, Timon of Athens, Julius Caesar, Macbeth, Hamlet, Troilus and Cressida, King Lear, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, The Sonnets, Venus and Adonis, The […]

Comments are closed.


%d bloggers like this: